We are now shipping ALL items via contactless delivery - - -  some deliveries may experience delays, thank you for your patience.  learn more here.

TIME TO RECONNECT: NATIVE WOMEN'S WILDERNESS

October 25, 2019

TIME TO RECONNECT: NATIVE WOMEN'S WILDERNESS

“IT’S NOT MY PEOPLE THAT HAVE TO REIMAGINE WHO SHOULD EXPLORE THE OUTDOORS. IT’S EVERYONE ELSE THAT NEEDS TO. IT’S THE OUTDOOR INDUSTRY THAT NEEDS TO CHANGE AND INCLUDE ALL PEOPLE OF COLOR TO EXPLORE OUR EARTH, JUST LIKE MY PEOPLE ALWAYS HAVE.” – NATIVE WOMEN’S WILDERNESS FOUNDER JAYLYN GOUGH. 

Yenabah” is a Navajo name meaning “Warrior woman who wanders the mountains.” This is the Navajo name of JAYLYN GOUGH, founder and executive director of NATIVE WOMEN’S WILDERNESSTrue to her name, Jaylyn founded Native Women’s Wilderness to get Native women outside and break assumptions about who is and who deserves to be outside. 

We sat down with Jaylyn to learn more about her motivations for creating this meaningful organization. 

 

Native Women Walking

 

HOKA: What is the mission of Native Women’s Wilderness? 

Jaylyn: To inspire and raise the voices of Native Women in the outdoor realm. To encourage a healthy lifestyle grounded in the wilderness. To educate Natives and non-Natives on the rich beauty and heritage of the Ancestral Lands beneath our feet. 

HOKA: Why is it important to you to encourage connection with Ancestral Lands? 

Jaylyn: The land our ancestors walked on is the land that gives us strength. It gives us an opportunity to see who we are, but also who we could be. We receive healing from the land. There’s the Trail of Tears, there’s the Long Walk, and there are so many places where I can feel the strength of my ancestors as I walk. If they were able to get through the Long Walk, I can overcome the challenges of my life. 

Our history may be broken. Too many spirits, hearts and lives are broken. The land is crying. But I believe that the only way to reimagine what can be, the only way to heal, is to revisit and connect with the land that connects us all. I think many people who have that connection to the land feel that strength, and honour the land, and honour our ancestors because it’s who we are. It’s ingrained in us. To be in the land is to live and breathe for me. I don’t have to think about it. It’s how I get through life. 

Native Women Walking

 

HOKA: Through your life, has your personal relationship with being in the outside ever gone through a change? 

Jaylyn:  As a child living on the reservation, everyone looked like me. Everyone had the same black hair. We would play outside and we would flick baby rattlesnakes at each other, or boys would put black widows in my hair. I think once I realized that not everyone looks the same in the “real world” it became a huge injustice to me that not all people were represented. Why is it that only white CIS gender people are allowed and are represented outside? Why can’t my people be represented outside? Why are we not given the same opportunities when, actually, this is our land and it’s through broken treaties and pushing our people off into the reservation that we have lost this? We know the land better than anyone else.   

So that has really propelled me to figure out, how do I make it? How do I get a little girl to look up and see someone that looks like her outside, and give her that opportunity to do amazing things? I want her to know that she can be a mountaineer and go climb Fourteeners or even Mount Everest.   

Meet Jaylyn and Native Women’s Wilderness in HOKA ONE ONE: Time to Reconnect. 

Learn more about HOKA trail products HERE. 





Also in TIME TO FLY

TIME TO KEEP MOVING FORWARD WITH MAGDA BOULET
TIME TO KEEP MOVING FORWARD WITH MAGDA BOULET

September 16, 2020

Magda Boulet, wears many hats throughout her day. She’s VP of Innovation at GU Energy labs, a professional Ultra Runner for HOKA ONE ONE, Coach in her running community, and most importantly, she’s a mom of a teenager.

Learn why movement means so much to her.

Continue Reading

TIME TO TAKE ACTION
TIME TO TAKE ACTION

August 14, 2020

Pattie Gonia wears a lot of hats. From photographer to Eagle Scout, environmentalist to “backingbacking queen,” she’s an advocate for the outdoors in as many ways as possible. But perhaps most importantly, she’s a self-described ally-in-progress. We asked Pattie to describe what allyship means to her, the importance of making mistakes, and what  steps we can all take to make the outdoors (and the world) a better place for everyone.

Continue Reading

TIME TO BRING OUT THE BEST IN EACH OTHER WITH REITAKU UNIVERSITY’S RYO MIYATA
TIME TO BRING OUT THE BEST IN EACH OTHER WITH REITAKU UNIVERSITY’S RYO MIYATA

July 02, 2020

While the words Hakone Ekiden may not mean much to the average American (even to the devout runner), it’s tantamount to the Superbowl in Japan. An ekiden (駅伝) is a long-distance running multistage relay race popular in Japan that garners nationwide viewership in the millions. What is it about the ekiden that inspires a nation to run long distances? We sat down with Ryo Miyata, an ekiden runner from Reitaku University, to explain just what makes this event so captivating, the importance of the sash, and what he’s learned along the way

Continue Reading